http://youtu.be/glU17uXDQXg

Does anyone know these people? They doored a lady, verbally abused her and refused to give their details across. Melbourne CBD approx 7pm on March 17th

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Thats really awful. No details from the CEO/Banker/Lawyer looking fellow or his sycophants or the taxi driver.

What would have happened if she wasn't carrying a camera and was too injured to chase after them? She'd have no chance of getting any justice. Zero respect or interest in whether she was alright, not even an apology, just a mouthful of vitriol.

They seemed intoxicated to me but maybe thats the natural speed of their brains. Really hope the police do their jobs on this one.

The taxi driver actually pulled over out of the way, provided his details and waited for the police.  Its just not caught on video.

Hmmm .... Unpleasant.


That said,
Don't know if I'd be riding along that "cycle lane" ... Especially past stopped taxis.

I'm impressed by the bike rider's calmness, persistence and refusal to lose her temper in the face of such boorishness. 

The ARR quite clearly state that regardless of whether there was a bike lane there or not, it's legal for a bike to pass to the left of a stopped or slow-moving vehicle (I hate having to link to this but...) as long as it is not indicating AND turning left (makes sense), and also list the offence of causing a hazard alighting from a vehicle (rule 269(3)).

Meeja is reporting the cabbie picked them up from a bar. Really? Couldn't tell...

I'm not saying the cyclist was at fault, and I agree the left pass was perfectly legal. I've never ridden that street so i have no idea what normal practice would be. However, from the short piece of video shown, the gap looked pretty small, and I'm not sure I would be prepared to take a risk (legal or not) in a situation like that.

Obviously, the lady involved felt it was worth the risk, and her treatment by the "men" certainly was pretty poor, so I support her endeavours for justice. But, if you showed me the footage, without any titles telling me what was coming, and I saw a taxi stopping in traffic, and I saw the cyclists filtering through a narrow gap on the left, I would have said the cyclist was clearly risking being doored by the passengers.

In short:
Was the cyclists action illegal? No.
Did the cyclist deserve it? No.
Did the cyclist behave, in any way, inappropriately? No
Could the cyclist have anticipated the situation? I believe, yes.
Was the possible time saved by filtering, worth the risk of dooring? I believe not.

People on this forum often say they are prepared to break road laws to keep themselves safe. The situation above is the reverse. I believe the cyclist could have forsaken their right to filter to keep themselves safe and a decision to choose convenience over safety is a bad one.

Bernie like your analysis and largely agree, the only criticism I would offer is there is no indication that the taxi has actually stopped to let the suits out.

The question then is, is it realistic to that a rider must assume that someone will open a door in moving traffic?

In the same situation I probably would have stopped behind the taxis, but not if they were an ordinary car

It's very easy for all of us here to sit here on the lounge and dissect the footage to the Nth degree. But at the time it all happened very quickly ... It always does. Our infrastructure forces us to ride within door zones all the time and, you are right it is unreasonable for us to assume every door on every vehicle could open at any time. However, that skinny little bit of gutter leaves the rider with absolutely no where to go, and I think I would avoid it if possible ... Especially beside taxis and utes.

I'm not saying the cyclist was at fault, and I agree the left pass was perfectly legal. I've never ridden that street so i have no idea what normal practice would be. However, from the short piece of video shown, the gap looked pretty small, and I'm not sure I would be prepared to take a risk (legal or not) in a situation like that.

My practice on that street is to sit behind the traffic in the lane rather than filtering on the left. I don't believe there's any safety or time-saving benefit from getting to the front at that intersection. and (as you can all see) the lane is ridiculously small.

The woman did nothing illegal but I certainly felt uneasy watching her filter through such a small gap at the speed she did. As such I agree with Bernie's assessment here: while she was legally obliged to do what she did it certainly added to her personal risk without much gain. I see similar things from cyclists every day around the city.

Of course, the biggest culprit here is the crappy design that allows this kind of conflict, but for the time being it's all we've got.

I agree. I wouldn't ever ride in such a way that this would happen to me however she technically did nothing wrong.

Your final point is the most important one: crap 'infrastructure' is the problem here. In many instances this sort of rubbish is worse than nothing. That's not to say that we should have nothing instead (although the diehard vehicular cyclists would argue that), rather we should be designing out conflict.

This is precisely the principle behind Sustainable Safety which we seem to ignore in this country. The environment should make all road users movements clear & unambiguous, minimising conflict if not removing it entirely and ensuring that when conflict *does* occur the results are trivial.

I don't expect any serious concern to be shown in my lifetime, depressingly.

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