Having a coffee at a new cafe near the new roundabout at Wigram Rd and Booth St and saw a few interesting ways to tackle the roundabout. Not a particularly bike friendly intersection, given buses and trucks can just ignore the island, while cyclists have a negative camber to counter if they go round the island, where you lose speed, (or likely crash if you misjudge), and then a battle up the hill to follow.

If it is OK for buses and trucks to mount the central island, is it OK for bikes? 

 

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Should ask the owner to give up a car space or two up the top? There is bike parking underneath the supermarket but you have to go through the car park and down to the rear. No signs indicating the bike parking either. Haven't seen the parking yet, can anyone report?

Re pedestrian safety, there is little room for error when buses turn left into Wigram. Front and rear of buses go within mm of the refuge and the kerb, as predicted by CoS, who opposed this outcome originally. Also cyclists are tempted to use that crossing to get onto or offthe shared path on the CoS side of Booth St, which is a big worry. In discussions with the Councils involved we asked for a shared path on the other (Leichhardt) side, where the path is wider and could be widened further They seem to be preparing to do some bridge repairs. Have seen several cyclists using the footpath on the bridge, coming down from PB Rd, some by necessity as were jammed into the kerb by passing cars, and kids on bikes use the footpath too. I still think the shared path on the western side of Booth is a good idea, and will be asking Leichhardt to look at it. Glad to hear of any comments on this.

I thought that was the whole point of these "fried egg" roundabounts (even better when they paint the middle bit bright yellow) - they put them in spots where it's difficult for some vehicles to travel around them (a la trucks and buses making right-hand turns) but the principles of who gives way to who still applies. The thing I like about cyclists flying over the top of them is that it removes any ambiguity about whether you were turning left or going straight, and if turning right, then you're forced to slow down to an accident-avoiding speed.

There is a similar one at the top of Berowra Waters Rd just before it joins the Old Pacific Highway - it's a T-intersection with a side street off to the left and you're on a downhill run in to it, so it makes sense just to fly through the middle while giving way as required.

If it wasn't intended that you can drive/ride over the top then I'm sure they'd be constructed with an elevation and signage &/or greenery to prevent it. The other way to find out would be to park a tent in the middle - which used to be a popular form of protest back home in the '90s - pick a busy grassed round about and stay there until you've made your point or you're moved on.

The 470 bendy bus would move you on pretty quickly!

It is quite legal to go across a roundabout island (keeping to the left of centre , to avoid head ons, which I dont think the garbage truck was) if you are in a large vehicle that can't fit around the left in the conventional sense. Cyclists are not supposed to though, so I guess we will cop abuse for doing it, and also have to think of the recent fatal crash on Pittwater Rd at the roundabout at Buffalo Park.

This was a dangerous intersection for cyclists before the roundabout, mainly because of cars and buses emerging from Wigram Rd, and maybe marginally safer now in that respect, but more dangerous in others. It has a reverse camber for a start, sloping from right to left in the photo, so easy to get your line and leaning angle wrong going into the roundabout in the direction the photo is showing. Get it wrong and you will collect the kerb on the exit side. Too slow and you lose momentum for the uphill to come.

Coming the other way, I saw cyclists hugging the kerb and inviting cars to squeeze past before the roundabout. If you take the lane it would be safer, but a risk of a rear shunt if person behind is hustling or a car pulls out quickly from Wigram etc. Saw it all, including one woman who was hugging the kerb, got squeezed and luckily escaped to the footpath via the pedestrian ramp.

The thing I like about cyclists flying over the top of them is that it removes any ambiguity about whether you were turning left or going straight, and if turning right, then you're forced to slow down to an accident-avoiding speed.

Are you serious?

I don't think there is anything to like about a cyclist going straight over the roundabout at speed. It is an unpredictable maneuver which removes the cyclist from the place that motorists are going to be looking for other traffic. Clip the lip at anything other than perpendicular and you run the risk of losing the bike from underneath you. I shouldn't have to remind people of the potential consequences of that.

The RMS says:

The roundabout sign means Slow Down, prepare to Give Way and if necessary stop to avoid a collision.

So, as you're approaching a roundabout, you must get into the correct lane, indicate if turning, and give way to traffic already on the roundabout.

Enter the roundabout when there is a safe gap in the traffic.

So, I don't really see how "flying" could ever be a legitimate or safe way of entering a roundabout, no matter what vehicle you are controlling. Well, at least not until we get some of these:

By flying I mean travelling over the top, not doing so at speed. Find and replace with "progressing in an orderly manner". Sorry for the ambiguity. What I meant is how many times have you travelled straight through a round about in the normal way, and because you enter it by turning slightly to the left, the car waiting to enter it from the left (wrongly) assumes you're exiting to the left and pulls out right in front of you? If on the other hand it was a fried egg round about you could slow down, give way etc (I in no way meant to imply these things shouldn't be done, and I trust from the nature of all my previous posts my position on road safety is pretty clear and therefore I wouldn't advocate for any different at round abouts), and then proceed across the round about - in this case it is much more clear you won't be exiting to the left.

Even with amendments I still think risks outweigh returns. Roundabouts can be a bad place for cyclists, but I think the best response to that is to ride through them as defensively and predictably as possible, not do anything "unexpected".  

Don't have the link, but read some research about cyclists' use of roundabouts, and it found that motorists tended to not see, and therefore crash into, those cyclists who went either straight through the middle, or went a straightish line, or hugged the edge.

Those that went a circular line, staying in the middle of the lane throughout the entire intersection, faired the best.

It was interesting to me that even straightening out your line by cutting close to the lip at the apex of the curve was associated with motorists' "failure to see".

The main reason straight line has a higher accident probability is because the group of straight line adopters is confounded with excessive speed group, who may in fact be the second entrant to the roundabout in some cases.  In many designs, bicycles are the second fastest users after motorcycles.

how many times have you travelled straight through a round about in the normal way, and because you enter it by turning slightly to the left, the car waiting to enter it from the left (wrongly) assumes you're exiting to the left and pulls out right in front of you?

0 (and that includes several forays into the Central Coast and Western Sydney).

Take the lane at all intersections. Indicate your intentions. Ride with pride.

Okay all points taken - can't (& don't) disagree with them.

Possibly buses and trucks should have to cross the roundabout at 10 K max, some I have seen would be doing 30 or 40.

Re cyclists being visible, that is the problem with roundabouts. You are pretty invisible on approach, particularly if you hug the kerb.

The cars coming down hill from PB Rd have virtually no slowing , as the approach lane is wide, but not wide enough to pass a cyclist safely, and angled neatly so they can just free flow. There is a camera up to observe the intersection, so hope it shows the problems cyclist have. Could be useful for a researcher like Marilyn Richards, who has an article in the Conversation today, or Steve Cumming, from Melbourne, who is interested in roundabout design for cyclists.
Definitely need to avoid hugging the kerb.

I reported a couple of old sunken trenches up near the top side street, which they only partially filled, so still bumpy. Could report these again and any others downhill to Leichhardt on 9367922 or email. Cos is responsible for uphill side.

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